HemaBlog™

Thanksgiving in Nepal

In America, we celebrate Thanksgiving in remembrance of how the native Americans assisted the struggling Pilgrims in New England. Right here in my native Massachusetts, in 1621, the Plymouth colonists and the Wampanoag Indians shared a harvest feast that is acknowledged as one of the first Thanksgiving celebrations in the colonies.

I’m not a foodie; farthest thing from it. And cooking? Forget it! My lack of cooking skills are becoming legendary. I like to celebrate Thanksgiving by also helping others in need. When I heard about a young man in need in Nepal, it was a chance to make Thanksgiving for him.

Meet Mohan Bhujel, who has hemophilia A. He’s a 28-year-old who lives in one of the remote villages of Sindhupalchowk, Nepal. In 2016 he was diagnosed with an inhibitor; this is almost like a death sentence in developing countries. Mohan’s condition turned deadly serious one day when an internal bleed in his stomach gradually spread into his right thigh and knee joint. Despite several attempts by doctors from several hospitals inside the Kathmandu valley, his bleeding could not be controlled. After multiple failed attempts,  Mohan was referred to the Christian Medical College (CMC) in Vellore, India; a place where miracles happen. There, doctors decided to amputate his right leg, which had turned gangrenous. He had to stay there for 18 months to recover completely.

Since his surgery, Mohan has had to use a wheelchair to carry out his daily work and activities. To add to his distress and challenges, the devastating earthquake of 2015 destroyed his house completely. Since the government assistance rebuilding the destroyed houses has been terribly inefficient, Mohan and his wife and a little son have had to live with his brother’s family. Unfortunately, he has had to also be the only provider for his family, despite his condition.

How could he get work with only one leg and being limited to a wheelchair? How could he support his family? When the Nepal Hemophilia Society asked us to consider buying a prosthetic leg for this young man, we didn’t hesitate. He now has a fantastic leg, and is mobile, happy, and ready to return to work!

Happy Thanksgiving!

2 thoughts on “Thanksgiving in Nepal”

  1. This is the true meaning of Thanksgiving….sharing our many blessings with others in need. Seeing the smile on Mohan’s face in the second picture is priceless. Thank you for sharing this hard but inspirational story Laurie! I will be sharing this story with my own family.

    Reply

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2 thoughts on “Thanksgiving in Nepal”

  1. This is the true meaning of Thanksgiving….sharing our many blessings with others in need. Seeing the smile on Mohan’s face in the second picture is priceless. Thank you for sharing this hard but inspirational story Laurie! I will be sharing this story with my own family.

    Reply

Leave a Comment

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